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Stock# 50430
Description

Nice example of the first edition of Sanson's map of Madagascar and the southern part of Africa.

In the cartouche, Sanson credits the details of the map to Samuel Blommaert and Livio Sanuto.

Samuel Blommaert was a Flemish/Dutch merchant and director of the Dutch West India Company from 1622 to 1629 and again from 1636 to 1642. In the latter period, he was a paid commissioner of Sweden in the Netherlands and he played a dubious but key role in Pierre Minuit's expedition that led to the Swedish colonizing of New Sweden. In 1645 he was appointed for a third time as a manager of the WIC, being one of the main investors from the beginning. Blommaert also receives credit from Sanson on his map of the west coast of Africa.

Livio Sanuto (c.1520-1576), was a Venetian cosmographer, mathematician, and maker of terrestrial globes and also belonged to the prestigious Lafreri school of engravers, whose output signaled the transition between the maps of Ptolemy and the maps of Mercator and Ortelius. He and his brother Giulio planned a massive and comprehensive atlas to include maps and descriptions of the whole world, which he believed would be more accurate than any previously published. Unfortunately, he died in 1576 having only completed 12 maps of Africa. The 12 maps were eventually published in 1588 by Livio's brother Giulio, under the title " Geografia Di M. Livio Sanuto..." . In the compilation of this and the other African maps, Sanuto relied on Gastaldi's 1564 map and Portuguese sea charts for the mapping of the coasts and for information about the interior, used accounts by Duarte Barbosa and João de Barros. After its publication in 1588 this work was copied by other leading map makers for nearly a century afterward.

Condition Description
Old outline hand-color. Trimmed close to neatline on all sides (as usual).
Nicolas Sanson Biography

Nicholas Sanson (1600-1667) is considered the father of French cartography in its golden age from the mid-seventeenth century to the mid-eighteenth. Over the course of his career he produced over 300 maps. His success can be chalked up to his geographic and research skills, but also to his partnership with Pierre Mariette. Previously, Sanson had worked primarily with the publisher Melchior Tavernier. Mariette purchased Tavernier’s business in 1644. Sanson worked with Mariette until 1657, when the latter died. Mariette’s son, also Pierre, helped to publish the Cartes générales de toutes les parties du monde.