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Stock# 40785mb
Description

The Final Naval Conflict of the American Civil War -- Farragut's Seizure of Mobile Bay

Interesting chart showing the plan of action in Mobile Bay on August 5, 1864.

The explanation notes:

  • "No.1. Ships lashed together and running in from Sea, and the monitors running out of "Monitor Bay" to take their station inside or eastward of the line."
  • "No.2. Running up the channel in line of battle, and engaging 'Fort Morgan' leading ship 'Brooklyn' encounters what she supposes to be 'torpedoes' monitor 'Tecumseh' is struck by one and sinks; Brooklyn backs astern causing confusion; Flag Ship takes the lead and passes up and engages the ram Tennessee and the gun boats of the enemy."
  • "No.3. Running fight with the enemy's fleet which ends in the capture of one, destruction of another, and the ram and one gun boat take shelter again under Fort Morgan."
  • "No.4. Fleet passes up and are in the act of anchoring when the ram Tennessee is seen coming out to attack them"
  • "No.5. Shows the manner the attack was made by the fleet upon the ram by ramming her in succession and keeping up a constant fire upon her at the same time."
    "The points of contact are shown by the sketch in the north east corner of the plate."

Admiral David Farragut

David Glasgow Farragut was a flag officer of the United States Navy during the American Civil War. He was the first rear admiral, vice admiral, and admiral in the United States Navy. He is remembered for his order at the Battle of Mobile Bay usually paraphrased as "Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead" in U.S. Navy tradition.

Born near Knoxville, Tennessee, Farragut was fostered by naval officer David Porter after the death of his mother. Farragut served in the War of 1812 under the command of his adoptive father. He received his first command in 1824 and participated in anti-piracy operations in the Caribbean Sea. He served in the Mexican-American War under the command of Matthew C. Perry, participating in the blockade of Tuxpan. After the war, he oversaw the construction of the Mare Island Naval Shipyard, the first U.S. Navy base established on the Pacific Ocean.

Though Farragut resided in Norfolk, Virginia prior to the Civil War, he strongly opposed secession and remained loyal to the Union after the outbreak of the Civil War. Despite some doubts about Farragut's loyalty, Farragut was assigned command of an attack on the important Confederate port city of New Orleans. After fighting past Fort St. Philip and Fort Jackson, Farragut captured New Orleans in April 1862. He was promoted to rear admiral after the battle and helped extend Union control up along the Mississippi River, participating in the Siege of Port Hudson. With the Union in control of the Mississippi, Farragut led a successful attack on Mobile Bay, home to the last major Confederate port on the Gulf of Mexico.

Farragut was promoted to Admiral following the end of the Civil War and remained on active duty until his death in 1870.

Condition Description
Minor toning and foxing.