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Description

Rare plan of Santo Domingo, published in Madrid by Tomas Lopez.

The map shows Santo Domingo, then capital of Hispaniola (now the Dominican Republic). The map is oriented with east at the top.

Includes a key locating 35 points of interest within the city.

Santo Domingo

Dating from 1496, when the Spanish settled on the island, and officially from August 5,1498, Santo Domingo became the oldest European city in the Americas. Bartholomew Columbus founded the settlement and named it La Nueva Isabela, after an earlier settlement in the north named after the Queen of Spain Isabella I. León's colonization of Puerto Rico, Diego Velázquez de Cuéllar's colonization of Cuba, Hernando Cortes' conquest of Mexico, and Vasco Núñez de Balboa's sighting of the Pacific Ocean were all launched from Santo Domingo.

In 1586, Francis Drake captured the city and held it for ransom. Drake's invasion signaled the decline of Spanish dominion over Hispaniola, which was accentuated in the early 17th century by policies that resulted in the depopulation of most of the island outside of the capital. An expedition sent by Oliver Cromwell in 1655 attacked the city of Santo Domingo, but was defeated. The English troops withdrew and took the less guarded colony of Jamaica, instead. In 1697, the Treaty of Ryswick included the acknowledgement by Spain of France's dominion over the Western third of the island, now Haiti.

From 1795 to 1822 the city changed hands several times along with the colony it headed. The city was ceded to France in 1795 after years of struggles, it was briefly captured by Haitian rebels in 1801, recovered by France in 1802, and was once again reclaimed by Spain in 1809. In 1821 Santo Domingo became the capital of an independent nation after the Criollo bourgeois within the country, led by José Núñez de Cáceres, overthrew the Spanish crown. The nation was unified with Haiti just two months later.

Condition Description
Minor discoloration at centerfold.
Tomás López Biography

Tomas Lopez (1730-1802) was one of Spain’s most prominent cartographers in the eighteenth century. Along with a small cadre of Spanish geographers, Tomas sought training in Paris and studied under Juan Bautista Bourguignon d’Anville. When he returned to Spain he was named geografo de los dominios de Su Magestad and placed in charge of the geographic collections of Charles III. Some of his most famous maps are those of regions of the Iberian Peninsula. At the end of his life, he embarked on a project of a grand atlas of Spain. The project was finished by his children.